ALERT: Police Officers Now Being Targeted At Their Homes

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After the police chief in Puyallup, Washington, posted an alarming photo, which proves officers are being targeted in their homes, an alert is being issued nationwide. Even officers who go out of their way to conceal their occupation are being outed. Anyone even remotely associated with law enforcement needs to be especially vigilant.

Police on high alert

Law enforcement observers have been hesitant to reveal the extent of the threat to police, for fear of making it worse. It already is worse. As Law Enforcement Today writes, “soon after this threat started spreading like wildfire online, we had law enforcement from across the country reach out. They pointed out that the threat is already circulating. Many have asked us to address it so that departments are aware of it and can take precautions to make changes, if they deem it necessary – especially given how quickly it’s circulating. They made a valid point – it’s better to be aware of a potential danger and take precautions than to not know about it because of a national breakdown in communication.”

One of Police Chief Scott Engle’s officers in Puyallup, Washington, discovered a disturbing chalk drawing on the street in front of his home and instantly reported it. The Black Lives Matter inspired graffiti depicts a pig with the words “Pig lives here.” Two arrows take the guesswork out of it. For illiterate anarchists, ACAB and 1312 were scrawled next to the arrows. For those not up on the latest gangster speak, “ACAB” stands for “All Cops Are Bastards,” while “1312” means exactly the same thing, in elementary-school code replacing each letter with it’s number in the alphabetical arrangement.

Not only is the officer who lives in the home a member of his police force, he’s also a husband, dad, grandfather, neighbor, veteran, and coach. “He wants to serve and protect.” As the chief notes, “we need police officers. We need someone to call when the drunk driver drives down the road in front of us or passed out behind the wheel. We need someone to call when the domestic abuser has beat up their partner.” From car wrecks to gun battles, “we will always need someone to call and police officers will always answer the call,” he insists. The police and the community both critically need each other. Chief Engle believes that they’re “in it together and that police officers cannot do their jobs without the support of their community.” Things certainly aren’t the same as they used to be. “It used to be that people saw a police car in their neighborhood as a sense of safety. Unfortunately, we are living in a world now where police officers are worried about their own homes and that’s just the honest truth.” People, Engle points out, “cannot live in a society where everyone gets to do whatever they want, whenever they want without any rules or without any accountability.”

Incidents spreading nationwide

Ever since the death of George Floyd in late may, incidents of violence and threats to police are escalating exponentially. Two women were arrested for vandalizing the home of the officer accused in the murder by dumping red paint on Derek Chauvin’s front door. While he was a direct participant in the original inflammatory incident, an officer in Tucson, Arizona had nothing to do with it.

According to the Tucson Police Officers Association, “a Tucson Police Officer came home and found his home and his personal vehicle vandalized.” It was clearly done “in response to the ongoing civil unrest in the city and across the country.” What was especially troubling was that he didn’t advertise that he worked on the force. “He does not take a police car home. He does not wear a uniform to or from his house. He does not have a thin blue line flag or any pro cop stickers.”

That alone has ominous repercussions. “The only way to explain this damage was that he was targeted. Targeted for the job he does. Targeted because he answered the call to serve his community.” If we want civilization, something has to change. “This is unacceptable. How does something like this further the discussion that our country so desperately needs to have? How does scaring the family of a police officer help to improve relationships?”

Law Enforcement Today warns their readers and everyone associated with the law enforcement community that reports are coming in from communities in many states that “small groups of individuals appear to be canvassing neighborhoods and taking pictures of homes that have police cruisers in the driveways.” One police spokesman verified, “I can absolutely confirm this. We’ve received multiple reports throughout the weekend both in terms of phone calls and alerts that neighborhood residents are putting out on community watch apps.” Police are also receiving direct, personal threats through social media, calls and emails. “We and our children are receiving threats,” one police lieutenant relates. “We expect danger when on the job,” said one sergeant, “but this is different. They are threatening to burn down our homes and kill our families.”

8 COMMENTS

  1. Time to make ANY harassments of Police Families a felony offense and mandatory sentencing. I know what I would do if some thug harsassed my family!

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